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The Book of Genesis in the Bible notes that God said “let there be light” in the dome of the sky to separate the day from the night.

Harnessing some of that daytime light is now part of Peace Dale Congregational Church’s environmental ministry, as the church will soon be outfitted with solar panels — which will also bring the material benefit of a lower monthly electric bill.

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A nationwide lumber shortage is poised to affect the number of homes South County Habitat for Humanity can build for needy families, so the group is appealing to the public for help.

COVID-19 volunteer safety restrictions, a host of other delays and the price of lumber are to blame. Lumber prices have soared more than 180% since last spring, according to the National Association of Home Builders.

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Suez Water RI and the state Department of Health, following The Independent’s review of public notices about recent water contamination, acknowledged this week that their communication to customers and the public was inadequate.

“Customers may have been confused by, or misinterpreted, the PN (public notification) that was sent,” said Annemarie Beardsworth, state Department of Public Health spokesperson.

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By leaving his post at Monash University in Australia to become the next president of the University of Rhode Island, Professor Marc B. Parlange is coming full-circle.

Parlange, a Providence native, will become URI’s 12th president on Aug. 1. He succeeds David M. Dooley, who joined URI in July 2009 and has overseen the school’s steady transformation, both academically and in its facilities.

The URI Board of Trustees announced Parlange’s appointment Monday night after a unanimous vote.

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It’s been examined so many times since COVID-19 changed our lives last year, but adjusting and improvising has become a major part of the artist’s lifestyle during the pandemic. The audience is virtual, the material is digital and the work is often done remotely. Much like every other band and musician, The Naticks from East Greenwich have been navigating their own path during these crazy times. They’ve done live streams, they’ve released singles and they’ve even been writing a blog. They were doing some of these things before the pandemic hit, but without the opportunity to consistently play live shows, these outlets have become the band’s primary creative avenues.

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Comedian, magician and ventriloquist Andy Gross is bringing his Mind Boggling Variety Show to the Courthouse Center for the Arts this Friday night at 7:30 p.m.

Gross is known for his “split man” videos, in which he appears to be cut in half — carrying his bottom half with his top half — and other illusions that have garnered hundreds of millions of views on YouTube and have led to appearances on The Ellen Show, ABC, CBS, FOX, CNN and MTV.

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It’s been a record year for pet adoptions, but whether the good fortune will continue for “COVID companions” is a question arising as pandemic restrictions begin to ease, say animal protection advocates.

With National Pet Day today, the matter is getting attention from animal welfare officials. They pointed to the soaring adoption rates of a homebound society last year and expressed their concerns now that the world is reopening.

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In early 18th century New England, a young woman living alone gets a visit from a powerful man who suspects her of using witchcraft.

What happens next is explored in “To Dust All Return,” a short film written and directed by University of Rhode Island student Alyssa Botelho.

“I’ve always been a huge fan of period pieces and it’s been a dream of mine to create one set in colonial New England,” Botelho said.

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The letter ‘a’ is many things. It’s the first letter of the alphabet. It’s the third-most commonly used letter in the English language, and the most commonly used in Italian, Portuguese and Turkish languages. It’s the scarlet letter, the best grade and the name of a crack commando unit featuring Mr. T.