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From a bustling New York Street to kissing skulls, the artists in the new Wickford Arts Association exhibition, which opened last week, embraced the theme of “Anything Goes.”

The “Anything Goes” exhibit allows participating artists to submit works in any medium and any subject matter, said Maria Masse, Wickford Art Association’s Gallery Director. The only exception was no photography as the gallery has an exclusive photo exhibit once a year.

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Open Studios and Drive-By Art successfully returned to Conanicut Island last weekend, featuring work from 29 local artists, Lucy Paiva, Jamestown Arts Center Marketing Director, said.

The Jamestown Arts Center (JAC) and Conanicut Island Association (CIAA) jointly hosted the one-day, island-wide event where participating artists opened their studios or outdoor space to display their art to the public.

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Director Kenny Ingram and his cast brought laughs, smooth dance moves and a few hours of melodies that reached the rafters of Theater By The Sea as it opened a run of the classic “Cinderella.”

So much talent came from the stage in equal measure that the audience kept interrupting performers with applause and cheers unlike most musicals this summer in the 89-year-old barn theater on Cards Pond Road.

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Contemporary Theater Company’s “The Neverending Story” can bring someone watching a pause to consider the value of having a never-ending imagination that becomes as much fantasy as reality.

Many themes — fantasy, adventure, grief, supernatural, death, bullying and the power of storytelling — appear. The most telling in this CTC production, however, is the cauldron mixing desire with actual events.

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How many people realize women’s coronary arteries are understudied, underdiagnosed, and undertreated? The Cleveland Clinic, a leading cardiology center, says heart disease is seven times deadlier for women than breast cancer. Build up of plaque in the heart’s arteries contributes to the death of one in every three women, more than all cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and accidents combined.

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People have been swooning for joy since at least the 13th Century when the earliest recorded use of the word can be found. By the 20th Century, losing consciousness for love and rapture was a necessary attribute of a Southern belle. Even today, swooning has a positive connotation, defined as, “a few steps beyond being happy, but not so over the top that you scare children.”

But change the language describing the same loss of consciousness and “blacking out like a light” is not so  glamorous. Parents fainting with a thud on the floor most certainly gives the kids a fright.