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In his excellent article about North Kingstown’s (and many other parts of Rhode Island’s) role in slavery from early in the 17th century, G. T. Cranston begins by saying, “I don’t know diddly about CRT…”. I beg to differ.

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In November 2020, millions of voters like me went to the polls and cast a ballot for Joe Biden.

Now, with a relentless GOP attack on our voting rights underway, I’m asking President Biden to return the favor. It’s time for Biden to go further than talking about supporting voting rights legislation. We need him to come out and fully support ending the filibuster so the Senate can finally pass voting rights legislation like the Freedom to Vote Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act.

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Several months after our council deliberated at multiple Town Council meetings, I recently received two inquiries about the proposed roundabout at the intersection of Boston Neck, Philips, and Brown streets. In light of the questions posed by these citizens I thought I would write to our community to explain the process, what has transpired, and the current status of the proposed roundabout.

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In an intercollegiate sailing race years ago, an opponent lied to race officials in order to have my team disqualified and his standing improved, something he boasted about when he did not recognize me at a different event a few months later. Refusing to be embarrassed, he said it couldn’t have been cheating because the officials were involved. I learned then that some people imagine winning is always justified, by any means necessary.

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We know that sometimes politicians make promises during their campaign. These promises may be ignored and forgotten after the person is elected.

Seldom do these broken promises result in hardship to thousands of people.

Unfortunately, with Councilor Ewa Dzwierzynski’s recent vote to support the three college student limit ordinance, she has broken her promises and negatively impacted thousands of people – students, parents and families, homeowners and voters.

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The public’s business should be open to the public. And under Rhode Island law, it is. Yet when mom Nicole Solas sought to attend the meeting of a publicly funded committee that meets weekly to discuss and make recommendations on policies that apply across her daughter’s school district, she was told that the meeting was closed and parents were not welcome.

Now, the Goldwater Institute is pushing back: We’ve joined with the Stephen Hopkins Center for Civil Rights in Rhode Island to represent Nicole in a complaint before the state attorney general asserting that the school district has violated Rhode Island’s Open Meetings Act (OMA) by closing these meetings to the public. 

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The head-spinning piece by state historian laureate Patrick Conley (“Remembering RI’s overlooked Olympian,” Aug. 5) should win a medal for logical long jump. With no effort he pivots in one brief paragraph from the approach, an appreciation of a 1912 Olympic track medalist, to a ridiculous leap in which George Washington is in an airplane – his point being to scorn those of us who think the Founders might have done more to bring American freedoms to the enslaved people that enriched them.  

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On July 29, Rhode Island Gov. Dan McKee and representatives from small businesses and state government held a virtual meeting on a proposed action agenda to address the needs of our state’s small businesses in the upcoming Fiscal 2022-2023 state budget. Several of the usual items were brought up, including access to financing and easing burdensome regulations.

However, one important issue was not addressed during the forum. In particular, what will Rhode Island do to help support and grow our state’s self employed, sole proprietors, independent contractor and gig workers?